Adolescents

Important mental health habits—including coping, resilience and good judgment—help adolescents to achieve overall well-being and set the stage for positive mental health in adulthood. Although mood swings are common during adolescence, approximately one in five adolescents has a diagnosable mental disorder, such as depression and/or “acting out” conditions that can include extremely defiant behavior. Friends and family can watch for warning signs of mental disorders and urge young people to get help. Effective treatments exist and may involve a combination of psychotherapy and medication. Office of Adolescent Health, US Department of Health and Human Services.

Anabolic Steroids
Awareness is growing that steroid use can cause significant physical and mental harm and may be life threatening. Some studies have identified steroids as gateway drugs to other substance use, including opioids.  Learn more...

Inhalant Abuse
Inhalants are chemical vapors that people inhale on purpose to get "high." The vapors produce mind-altering, and sometimes disastrous, effects. These vapors are in a variety of products, such as paints, glues, gasoline, and cleaning fluids, which are common in almost any home or workplace.  Learn more...

Club Drugs GHB, Ketamine, and Rohypnol
Club drugs are a group of psychoactive drugs that tend to be abused by teens and young adults at bars, nightclubs, concerts, and parties. Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB), Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine  are some of the drugs included in this group.  Learn more...

Self-Harm
"Self-harm" is the deliberate, direct destruction of the body that results in tissue damage. When someone engages in self-harm, they may have a variety of intentions.  Learn more...

Self-Mutilation
Several definitions of self-mutilation exist. In fact, researchers and mental health professionals have not agreed upon one term to identify the behavior. Self-harm, self-injury, and self-mutilation are often used interchangeably.   Learn more...

Depression
Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad, but these feelings are usually fleeting and pass within a couple of days. When a person has a depressive disorder, it interferes with daily life, normal functioning, and causes pain for both the person with the disorder and those who care about him or her. Depression is a common but serious illness, and most who experience it need treatment to get better.  Learn more...

Depression and Disability in Children and Adolescents
For many years, depression and other disorders of mood were thought to be afflictions of only adults. Within the past three decades, however, it has become evident that mood disorders are common among children and adolescents. This digest focuses on three depressive disorders that are exhibited in childhood and adolescence.   Learn more...

Depression FAQs
Depression is a prolonged or deep emotional sensation of sadness, being "blue", or "down." Depressive feelings such as discouragement or sadness are perfectly normal if they do not become too severe or last too long. Depression becomes a clinical problem if a person's mood becomes too depressed or if the episode lasts more than two weeks.  Learn more...

Depression and High School Students
Depression is a common but serious mental illness typically marked by sad or anxious feelings. Most students occasionally feel sad or anxious, but these emotions usually pass quickly - within a couple of days. Untreated depression lasts for a long time and interferes with your day-to-day activities.   Learn more...

Antidepressant Medications for Children and Adolescents: Information for Parents and Caregivers
As it is in adults, depression in children and adolescents is treatable. Antidepressant medications can be beneficial to children and adolescents with depression. However, knowledge of antidepressant treatments in youth, is limited compared to what is known about treating depression in adults. There is some concern that the use of antidepressant medications may induce suicidal behavior in youths. Some psychological therapies also have been shown to be effective.  Learn more...

Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Symptoms of bipolar disorder are severe. They are different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through from time to time. Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. But bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead full and productive lives.  Learn more...

Bipolar Disorder FAQs
People who have the classic form of bipolar disorder experience alternating periods of depressed moods and periods of manic or excited moods. This condition is sometimes referred to as "mood swings" or manic depressive disorder. Other people with bipolar disorder have episodes of a manic mood without episodes of depression. Still others with bipolar disorder have a mixture of depression and mania, a state of hyperactivity, at the same time.  Learn more...

Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens: A Parent’s Guide
This booklet discusses bipolar disorder in children and teens. Bipolar disorder often develops in a person's late teens or early adult years, but some people have their first symptoms during childhood.  Learn more...

Assessment of Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Symptoms of bipolar disorder are different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through from time to time. Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. But Bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead full and productive lives.  Learn more...

Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: A Guide for Patients and Families
EDIT - Bipolar disorder is a disease in which the person's mood changes in cycles over time. Over the course of the illness, the person experiences periods of elevated mood, periods of depressed mood, and times when mood is normal. The three most important types of medication used to control the symptoms of bipolar disorder are mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and antipsychotics.  Learn more...

Co-Occurring Alcohol Use Disorder and Schizophrenia
Alcohol use disorder is the most common co-occurring disorder in people with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients who abuse alcohol are more likely to have social, legal, and medical problems, compared with other people with schizophrenia.  Learn more...

Children of Alcoholics
More than 6 million children live with at least one parent who abuses or is dependent on alcohol or an illicit drug.  Learn more...

Adolescent Substance Abuse: An Interview with Howard A. Liddle, EdD
Adolescent substance abuse has become a bona fide clinical specialty in its own right, with its own theory, basic and applied research, practice guidelines, and policy studies.  Learn more...

Growing Up Drug Free: A Parent’s Guide to Prevention
(Needs Editing)  Learn more...

Teen Alcohol Use: Prevention Strategies for Parents
While parent-child conversations about not drinking are essential, talking isn't enough. Parents need to take concrete action to help their child resist alcohol. Research strongly shows that active, supportive involvement by parents and guardians can help teens avoid underage drinking and prevent later alcohol misuse.  Learn more...

Talking with Your Teen about Alcohol
Although many kids believe that they already know everything about alcohol, myths and misinformation abound.  Learn more...

Straight Facts About Drugs and Alcohol
Many signs, such as sudden changes in mood, difficulty in getting along with others, poor job or school performance, irritability, and depression, might be explained by causes other than drugs or alcohol. Unless you observe drug use or excessive drinking, it can be hard to determine the cause of these problems. A good first step is to contact a qualified alcohol and drug professional who can provide further advice.  Learn more...

Sleep Problems in Children and Teens
EDIT: http://www.athealth.com/consumer/newsletter/FPN_6_4.html  Learn more...

Assessing Young Children’s Social Competence
Research suggests that a child's long-term social and emotional adaptation, academic and cognitive development, and citizenship are enhanced by frequent opportunities to strengthen social competence during childhood.  Learn more...

Confidence – Helping Your Child Through Early Adolescence
Poor self-esteem often peaks in early adolescence, then improves during the middle and late teen years as identities gain strength and focus. Young teens with poor self-esteem can be lonely, awkward with others and sensitive to criticism and with what they see as their shortcomings.  Learn more...

Paraphilias
Paraphilias are sometimes referred to as sexual deviations or perversions. Paraphilias include fantasies, behaviors, or sexual urges focusing on unusual objects, activities, or situations.   Learn more...

Psychotic Disorders
Psychotic disorders are mental disorders in which the personality is seriously disorganized and a person's contact with reality is impaired. During a psychotic episode a person is confused about reality and often experiences delusions and/or hallucinations.   Learn more...

Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling brain disorder that has affected people throughout history. People with the disorder may hear voices other people don't hear. They may believe other people are reading their minds, controlling their thoughts, or plotting to harm them. This can terrify people with the illness and make them withdrawn or extremely agitated.  Learn more...

Schizophrenia: A Handbook For Families
This handbook has been primarily developed as a guide for families when early signs indicate that a relative may have schizophrenia, and as a resource for these families when a diagnosis of schizophrenia has been determined.  Learn more...

Expert Consensus Treatment Guidelines for Schizophrenia: A Guide for Patients and Families
Although widely misunderstood and unfairly stigmatized, schizophrenia is actually a highly treatable brain disease. The treatment for schizophrenia is in many ways similar to that for other medical conditions such as diabetes or epilepsy. The good news is that new discoveries are greatly improving the chances of recovery and making it possible for people with schizophrenia to lead much more independent and productive lives.  Learn more...

Divorce and Children
Although not all children who experience divorce have problems, children of divorce are twice as likely as children living in nondivorced families to have emotional and behavioral difficulties.  Learn more...

Stages of Adjustment to Divorce
Children's adjustment to divorce is a long process. Divorce does not happen all at once, either. It is a series of events and changes. At different points, children deal with different issues. Also, different children react to the same changes and situations in different ways. Some studies show that children react to divorce in three stages.  Learn more...

Symptoms of Emotional Damage to Children of High-Conflict Divorce
The long-term emotional damage to children as a result of the improper conduct of their parents during a divorce inhibits their ability to lead happy and productive lives within the society.  Learn more...

Parents’ Anger and Jealousy Are Damaging to Children after Divorce
Getting past the "couple conflicts" you've experienced for many years will allow you to focus on your child's needs - and on your own.  Learn more...

Trading Spaces, Sharing Parents: Helping Your Child Adjust to Visitation
Parents experiences with a new step-family are often difficult, but the changes and transitions are just as difficult for children. One particular problem for the child during visitation is sharing parents. A child may be feeling like a visitor in the new home, especially if the new spouse's children live there and the visiting child lives elsewhere.   Learn more...

Different Types of Parent-Child Relationships
There are at least four kinds of attachment relationship categories. The categories describe the ways that children act and the ways that adults act with the children. The strongest kind of attachment is called 'secure.' The way a parent or provider responds a child may lead to one of the four types of attachment categories. The way a child is attached to their parents also affects how they will behave around others when the parents are not present.  Learn more...

Ten Ways to Be a Better Dad
Too many fathers think teaching is something others do, but a father who teaches his children about right and wrong, and encourages them to do their best, will see his children make good choices. Involved fathers use everyday examples to help their children learn the basic lessons of life.  Learn more...

Tips for Dads: Practical Tips for Knowing Your Child
First, a father should listen to their children. Also, fathers  should listen to their child's friends, teachers, coaches, and, especially, their mothers. All of these people see a different side of the child, and they will give dads insights they would have never noticed on their own.   Learn more...

The Disneyland Daddy: A Case Study
Some families work out an arrangement in therapy that if the child is acting out, the father has to come over and help restrain him. It puts some responsibility back on the father and discourages him from creating the problem. I've seen divorced parents make agreements that if the child comes home and is acting out, he goes back to the father's and stay an extra night. This can only happen if mothers are empowered through the divorce decree and custody arrangement or through regular or court-ordered family therapy. But it's important for mothers in these situations to have that empowerment, so that the family has a structure for the co-parenting task.  Learn more...

Connecting with Your Kids: Strategies for Tough Conversations
The challenge for parents is to learn to listen and to be available without being pushy. They must find ways to talk about the hard stuff, so that the child feels comfortable sharing with their parent(s). If parents can control their emotions and keep the situation safe, the child may be able to  share their deepest worries.  Learn more...

Communication — Helping Your Child Through Early Adolescence
Adolescents often are not great communicators, particularly with their parents and other adults. When parents know where their children are and what they are doing and when the adolescent knows the parent knows, adolescents are at a lower risk for a range of bad experiences. It is easier to communicate with a young teen if parents established this habit when the child was younger.  Learn more...

Being an Effective Parent – Helping Your Child Through Early Adolescence
Parents often become less involved in the lives of their children as they enter the middle grades. But the young adolescent needs as much attention and love from their parents as they needed when they were younger.  Learn more...

Helping Your Child Learn Independence
Adolescents do best when they remain closely connected to their parents but at the same time are allowed to have their own points of view and even to disagree with their parents. This page contains some tips to help balance closeness and independence.  Learn more...

Tips for Helping the Child Who Expresses Anger
Some young people turn to violence, because they do not see other ways to endure what they are feeling at that moment. They may not anticipate the repercussions of their violence.  Learn more...

Positive Discipline
Positive discipline holds that the adult is wiser, in charge, not afraid to be the leader, and occasionally has priorities other than those of the child.   Learn more...

Parenting the Strong-willed Child
When children who are not generally strong-willed don't get what they want, they may feel sad, shrug off the disappointment, and then go on to something else. Strong-willed children, however, tend to demonstrate intense anger.   Learn more...

Parenting the Adopted Adolescent
When adopted children reach adolescence, their parents are likely to be anxious and have an additional set of questions. Will the child become confused about his or her identity? Will a sense of abandonment and rejection replace feelings of security and comfort?  Learn more...

Parenting Style and Its Correlates
This article defines and explores four types of parenting styles. The author then discusses the consequences of the different styles for children.  Learn more...

Homework Survival for Parents
This article contains helpful hints for parents to stop the battle and get their children to do their homework.  Learn more...

Recovering from Rejection
We are usually not taught by our parents or society at large how to effectively deal with rejection. First of all, we need to be aware that rejection is an essential facet of life. If we take chances and risks like trying out for a play, writing a book, applying to college or asking out the attractive man, there is the distinct possibility that none of these pursuits will work out.   Learn more...

Teens: Deciding About Sex
Despite what the media leads you to believe, not everyone is having sex. At least half of all teens decide not to have sex. Saying "no" to having sex is the only 100% sure way to protect against the risk of pregnancy.  Learn more...

Why Step Relationships Aren’t Easy
When two people remarry and one or both have children, they do not have the luxury of simply marrying as partners. They must commit to the complexity of learning to marry as parents, too. This parental dimension to their union requires additional communication as they not only work out how to function as a couple, but as a family, as well.   Learn more...

Sibling Conflict
Fighting is not a sign of children not getting along. It is how they get along - using conflict to test their power, establish differences, and ventilate emotion with a familiar family adversary. Conflict from sibling rivalry is built into family life as children compete for dominance, parental attention, parental support, and household resources.   Learn more...

Technology and Youth: Protecting Your Child from Electronic Aggression
Electronic aggression is any type of harassment or bullying that occurs through e-mail, a chat room, instant messaging, a website, blogs, or text messaging.  Learn more...

Bullying
Bullying refers to intentional and generally unprovoked attempts by one or more individuals to inflict physical hurt and/or psychological distress on one or more victims.  Learn more...

Bullying in Early Adolescence: The Role of the Peer Group
It cannot be assumed that bullying among young adolescents is a simple interaction between a bully and a victim. Instead, recent studies and media reports suggest that there are groups of students who support their peers and sometimes participate in teasing and harassing other students. It seems important for families, schools, and other community institutions to help children and young adolescents learn how to manage, and potentially change, the pressure to hurt their classmates in order to "fit in."  Learn more...

Bullying Prevention
Whether your school plans to implement one or more bullying prevention strategies, or a comprehensive bullying prevention or school improvement initiative, there are several issues to keep in mind that can increase your chances of success. Work with parents, students, administrators, teachers, and other school staff to develop a comprehensive, schoolwide policy on bullying that includes a clear definition of bullying and a description of how the school will respond to bullying incidents, as well as a discussion of program philosophy and goals.  Learn more...

The Truth About Bullies
Bullies bully other people to feel powerful around them and to feel power over them. Bullies start out feeling like zeroes, like nobodies. When they intimidate, threaten or hurt someone else, then they feel like somebody. The key is the feeling of power.  Learn more...

Bullies, Victims, and Bystanders: Types of Bullies
EDIT - A 1978 study described three different types of bully: the aggressive bully, the passive bully, and the bully-victim. These characterizations still hold true today. Aggressive bullies are the most common type of bully. Passive bullies, unlike the ultra-confident aggressive bullies, tend to be insecure. Bully-victims represent a small percentage of bullies who have been seriously bullied themselves.  Learn more...

Why Children Lie and What To Do About It
To many teenagers, lying seems to be the easy way out of trouble or into adventure that has been disallowed. But lying is deceptive: what seems simpler at the moment proves complicated over time. It can be helpful for parents to itemize the high cost of lying in order to encourage a return to truth. Parents should explain some of the costs that commonly accompany lying.  Learn more...

Treating Adolescent Survivors of Sexual Abuse
While most Americans can understand, although not condone, how some forms of child abuse occur, it is almost impossible for them to consider the idea of sexual abuse. This is particularly true when the abuser is a parent or family member.  Learn more...

Is It A Phase?
Parents are very prepared to tolerate phases. But they're not prepared to tolerate inappropriate behavior. So they may label the child's inappropriate behavior a "phase" because that makes it easier for them to accept it.  Learn more...

Oppositional Defiant Disorder: The War at Home
Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) lose their temper quickly and often. They are easily annoyed and frustrated by other people, resentful and hostile with adults, bossy and pushy with other kids. They blame everyone else for their difficulties and make excuses for their inability to cope. They gravitate toward negative peers and tend to be sulking, angry adolescents.  Learn more...

Conduct Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Children with conduct disorder repeatedly violate the personal or property rights of others and the basic expectations of society. A diagnosis of conduct disorder is likely when symptoms continue for 6 months or longer. Conduct disorder impacts the child and their families, neighbors, and schools.  Learn more...

Does Your Child Have “Toxic” Friends? 6 Ways to Deal with the Wrong Crowd
EDIT  Learn more...

Disruptive Behavior Disorders
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School Problems
EDIT - http://www.athealth.com/consumer/newsletter/FPN_4_1.html  Learn more...

Early Warning, Timely Response
EDIT: A Guide to Safe Schools  Learn more...

When Terrorists Strike: What School Counselors Can Do
The Adapted Family Debriefing Model for school students described in this article demonstrates promise for helping both student survivors of terrorism and their parents cope with negative psychological and social effects.  Learn more...

Learning Disabilities
Learning disabilities are caused by a difference in brain structure that is present at birth and is often hereditary. They affect the way the brain processes information. This processing is the main function involved in learning. Learning disabilities can impact how someone learns to read, write, hear, speak, and calculate. There are many kinds of learning disabilities and they can affect people differently.  Learn more...

Learning Disorders
A student may have a learning disorder if his/her achievement in reading, writing, or mathematics falls below what is expected for the child's age, grade level, and intelligence. To be called a learning disorder, the problems must have a negative impact on the person's academic success or another important area of life requiring math, reading, or writing skills.  Learn more...

Reading Disorder
Students with this learning disorder demonstrate reading skills that are significantly below what is normal considering the student's age, intelligence, and education. The poor reading skills cause problems with the student's academic success and/or other important areas in life.  Learn more...

Written Expression Disorder
Students with written expression disorder have writing skills that are significantly below what is normal considering the student's age, intelligence, and education. The poor writing skills cause problems with the student's academic success or other important areas of life.  Learn more...

Mathematics Disorder
Students with a mathematics disorder have problems with their math skills, which are significantly below normal considering the student's age, intelligence, and education. The poor math skills cause problems with the student's academic success and other important areas in the student's life.  Learn more...

Intellectual Disability
Intellectual disability is characterized both by a significantly below-average score on a test of mental ability or intelligence and by limitations in the ability to function in areas of daily life, such as communication, self-care, and getting along in social situations and school activities. Intellectual disability is sometimes referred to as a cognitive disability or mental retardation.  Learn more...

Self-esteem and Anxiety in Teens: 5 Ways to Start Real Conversations with Your Teen
The parent's job is to be a coach and not to step on the court - it's to coach from the sidelines. Parents should remove themselves from the court. They are not doing their child a favor by playing the game for them. Parents sometimes get in there because they want to help, but if they are doing that, ultimately they are handicapping their child.   Learn more...

Attention-Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD)
Attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder, ADHD, is highlighted by the persistent inability of a person to pay attention to what is considered important. There may be the additional characteristics of hyperactive motor movements and/or impulsivity.  Learn more...

Diagnosis and Treatment of ADHD: Interview with Harlan Gephart, MD
ADHD is a chronic health condition, and early identification and treatment of the disorder increase the child's chance for academic, emotional, and social success.  Learn more...

Peer Relationships and ADHD
Parents of children with ADHD may be more than twice as likely than other parents to report that their child is picked on at school or has trouble getting along with other children.  Learn more...

Behavioral Treatment for ADHD
Despite the well documented benefits of stimulant medication for treating ADHD, medication is no panacea, and some children with ADHD should not receive it.For all these children, other treatments are often necessary - and some would say, always necessary - to effectively treat ADHD.  Learn more...

Under the Radar: How Girls with ADHD Go Undetected And Why the Correct Diagnosis is Important for Girls and Boys Alike
Many parents and teachers do not suspect a young girl's inability to concentrate is due to ADHD. Girls with the disorder, frequently, are not hyperactive or disruptive. They may be just the opposite. Girls with ADHD tend to be quiet and to daydream. But these girls cannot concentrate or complete their schoolwork. Many parents are surprised when their daughter is diagnosed with ADHD.   Learn more...

Neurotherapy
Neurotherapy is a clinically proven, non-drug method of treating ADD/ADHD and other learning disabilities.  Learn more...

Understanding Your Child’s Behavior
If parents understand their child's behaviors and know what to expect at different developmental stages, the parent's reactions will, more likely, support and nurture the child.  Learn more...

Hyperactivity
Hyperactivity, which is sometimes associated with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), is defined as excessive physical activity or movements that have no purpose and are increased in speed.  Learn more...

Dating Violence
In a study, Molidor, Tolman, and Kober looked at the rates of dating violence for high school boys and girls, as well as the circumstances leading to and the outcomes of dating violence. The researchers discovered that 36.4% of the girls and 37.1% of the boys reported that they had experienced some physical violence in the dating relationship.  Learn more...

Social Phobia
Social phobia, also called social anxiety, is a disorder characterized by overwhelming anxiety and excessive self-consciousness in everyday social situations. People with social phobia have a persistent, intense, and chronic fear of being watched and judged by others and of being embarrassed or humiliated by their own actions. Their fear may be so severe that it interferes with work or school - and other ordinary activities.  Learn more...

Social Phobia’s Traumas and Treatments
Social phobia is far different from the run-of-the-mill nervousness associated with stressful situations. It's the intensity of the fear that distinguishes the condition from the almost inevitable butterflies that most people feel when they are about to give a speech or go to an interview or even a party.  Learn more...

Panic Disorder
Panic is a rush of overwhelming anxiety that comes on very quickly. People use the word "terror" to describe the severity of the anxiety connected with panic. Sometimes the sudden episode is called a panic attack.  Learn more...

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Obsessive-compulsive disorder, one of the anxiety disorders, is a potentially disabling condition characterized by obsessive thoughts or compulsive behaviors. While most people at one time or another experience such thoughts or behaviors, an individual with OCD experiences obsessions and compulsions for more than an hour each day, in a way that interferes with his or her life.  Learn more...

Healthier Eating
Most Americans consume too many calories and not enough nutrients, according to the latest revision to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The typical American diet is low in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and high in saturated fat, salt, and sugar. As a result, more Americans than ever are overweight, obese, and at increased risk for chronic diseases such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and certain cancers.  Learn more...

Diabetes in Children and Adolescents
Diabetes is one of the most serious health problems facing the world today. In the United States each year, more than 13,000 children are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Increasingly, health care providers are finding more and more children and teens with type 2 diabetes, a disease usually seen in people over age forty.  Learn more...

Overweight and Obesity: FAQs
Overweight and obesity are both labels for ranges of weight that are greater than what is generally considered healthy for a given height. The terms also identify ranges of weight that have been shown to increase the likelihood of certain diseases and other health problems.  Learn more...

Eating Disorders and Obesity
Eating disorders and obesity are usually seen as very different problems but actually share many similarities. This information sheet is designed to help parents, other adult caregivers, and school personnel better understand the links between eating disorders and obesity so they can promote healthy attitudes and behaviors related to weight and eating.  Learn more...

Anorexia
Anorexia, or anorexia nervosa, is an eating disorder. Anorexics have a problem keeping their body weight in a normal range or even above a minimal weight level considered to be healthy.
There are two types of anorexia; Restricting Type and Binge-Eating/Purging Type.  Learn more...

Binge Eating Disorder
Binge eating disorder is a newly recognized condition that probably affects millions of Americans. People with binge eating disorder frequently eat large amounts of food while feeling a loss of control over their eating. This disorder is different from binge-purge syndrome because people with binge eating disorder usually do not purge afterward by vomiting or using laxatives.  Learn more...

Bulimia
A person with bulimia usually engages in episodes of binge eating followed by the purging methods he/she has devised to prevent weight gain. The bulimic attempts to rid the body of the ingested food by purging. Purging takes the form of self-induced vomiting, the use of diuretics (water pills), or the heavy use of laxatives.   Learn more...

Body Image and Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Body image may be seen as "disturbed" when one's self-evaluation of appearance is at such a level that it interferes with social and/or occupational functioning, or causes elevated levels of anxiety and depression in the individual.  Learn more...

Characteristics and treatment of eating disorders
An eating disorder is marked by extremes. It is present when a person experiences severe disturbances in eating behavior, such as extreme reduction of food intake or extreme overeating, or feelings of extreme distress or concern about body weight or shape.  Learn more...

Treatment of Eating Disorders
Eating disorders are abnormal eating behaviors, which include anorexia and bulimia. Anorexia is defined as the refusal to reach or to keep a weight that is considered to be the minimum required for a person's height and age. Bulimia is an eating pattern of repeated occurrences of binge eating followed by attempts to keep from gaining weight.   Learn more...

BodyWise Handbook
The BodyWise Eating Disorders Initiative is a part of the Girl Power! Campaign, conducted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The campaign seeks to reinforce and sustain positive values and health behaviors among girls and to address eating disorders and disordered eating.  Learn more...

Girls, Aggressive?
Society's attention on aggression in children has focused primarily on boys. Many of us assume boys are more aggressive because their forms of aggression are more visible. We see them hitting or fighting on the playgrounds or in our homes. Girls are more apt to focus their aggression on relational issues with their peers. This kind of aggression is done with the intention of damaging another child's friendship or feelings of inclusion within a social group.  Learn more...

Questions and Answers About Acne
Acne is a disorder resulting from the action of hormones and other substances on the skin's oil glands (sebaceous glands) and hair follicles. These factors lead to plugged pores and outbreaks of lesions commonly called pimples or zits.  Learn more...

Your Child and Medication
One in ten of America's children has an emotional disturbance such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression or anxiety, that can cause unhappiness for the child and problems at home, at play, and at school. Since each child is different, choosing the right treatment for your child is very important. At times, psychotherapies, behavioral strategies, and family support may be very effective. In other cases, medications are needed to help the child become more able to cope with everyday activities.   Learn more...

When A Child Is Dying
A team of psychologists, hospice professionals, social workers and spiritual counselors can be helpful to the family as they say their goodbyes to the dying child and prepare for what lies ahead.   Learn more...

Answers to Common Questions about Counseling
Throughout life, there are times when help is needed to address problems and issues that cause emotional distress or make us feel overwhelmed. When experiencing these types of difficulties, individuals may benefit from the assistance of an experienced, trained professional.  Learn more...

Sports Injuries
In recent years, increasing numbers of people of all ages have been heeding their health professionals' advice to get active for all of the health benefits exercise has to offer. But for some people - particularly those who overdo or who don't properly train or warm up - these benefits can come at a price: sports injuries.  Learn more...

Motivating Underachievers Part 1: When Your Child Says “I Don’t Care”
There is a simple truth: It's impossible to have no motivation. Everybody is motivated - it just depends on what they're motivated to do. Rather than being unmotivated, some children are actually motivated to not perform and to resist their parents. In other words, they're motivated to do nothing.  Learn more...

Motivating Underachievers Part 2: Get Your Unmotivated Child on Track before School Starts
Before school starts and when things are going well, ask your child, "What did you learn from what you went through last year?" And then ask the follow-up question, "And what will you do differently this year?"  Learn more...

Understanding Violent Behavior in Children and Adolescents 
There is a great concern about the incidence of violent behavior among children and adolescents. This complex and troubling issue needs to be carefully understood by parents, teachers, and other adults. Learn more...

Complex Trauma in Children and Adolescents
The term complex trauma describes the dual problem of children's exposure to multiple traumatic events and the impact of this exposure on immediate and long-term outcomes. Typically, complex trauma exposure results when a child is abused or neglected, but it can also be caused by other kinds of events such as witnessing domestic violence, ethnic cleansing, or war.  Learn more...

The Numbers Count: Mental Health Disorders in America
Mental disorders are common in the United States and internationally. An estimated 26.2 percent of Americans ages 18 and older — about one in four adults — suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/the-numbers-count-mental-disorders-in-america/index.shtml   Learn more...