Violence In Mental Health Work – FPN

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Mental Health Information
February 2016 - Vol. 20 Issue 2
Published by athealth.com

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CONTENTS:

  1. Violence and Mental Illness
  2. The Risk of Violence in Mental Health Work
  3. Stay Safe in Practice
  4. Angry Words
  5. Managing the Violent Patient: A Guide for Psychologists and Other Mental Health Professionals
  6. Mental Illness and Violence
  7. Violence Against Mental Health Professionals: When the Treater Becomes the Victim
  8. Patient Violence Against Health Care Professionals
  9. Take caution: Look for DISTURBED Behaviors When You Assess Violence Risk
  10. Psychiatric Violence Risk Assessment

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1.  Violence and Mental Illness
Today, mental illness and violence are often seen as inextricably linked, creating a harsh stigma for
patients and an uncomfortable environment for clinicians.
PSYCHIATRY MMC

2.  The Risk of Violence in Mental Health Work
Researchers present findings and recommendations from a field study of safety hazards to community
mental health workers.
WORK AND HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF NURSING

3.  Stay Safe in Practice
Because some clients turn violent, this article presents some suggestions to protect yourself.
AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION (APA)

4.  Angry Words
Many people who are angry to isolate themselves from loved ones or others who are afraid of such
powerful emotions.
COUNSELING TODAY

5. Managing the Violent Patient: A Guide for Psychologists and Other Mental Health Professionals
Being threatened, harassed, attacked, or confronted by a patient with a weapon is becoming more
common and is likely to occur at some point in a mental health professional's career.
PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

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6. Mental Illness and Violence
Studies suggest that violence by people with mental illness stems from multiple overlapping factors
interacting in complex ways.
HARVARD MENTAL HEALTH LETTER

7. Violence Against Mental Health Professionals: When the Treater Becomes the Victim
This article examines the patient populations more likely to become violent and the mental healthcare
staff at the greatest risk of becoming their victims.
INNOVATIONS IN CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE

8. Patient Violence Against Health Care Professionals
Patients who feel they have been physically and/or psychologically injured are at increased risk for
committing violence against clinicians, especially if their complaints are dismissed.
PSYCHIATRIC TIMES

9. Take caution: Look for DISTURBED Behaviors When You Assess Violence Risk
The acronym DISTURBED can be a reminder about important patient-specific features that correlate
with violence.
CURRENT PSYCHIATRY

10. Psychiatric Violence Risk Assessment
Predicting human behavior, including violent behavior, is almost always difficult.
AMERICAN PSYCHIATRIC ASSOCIATION (APA)

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