Neuroscience of Trauma and Shame

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$17.00 for 1 credit

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Description

Our brains have an important job: to keep us safe and make sure we survive.

Since trauma can alter the structure and function of the brain, how does that impact us in the 'moment' and then later in life?

When a person experiences something traumatic, the brain shuts down all nonessential systems, signals the release of stress hormones, and moves you into survival mode: flight, fight, freeze, or fawn. When the threat has passed, your brain resumes normal functioning so you can rest and digest what has happened. However, for some, this switch back does not occur and in essence, the brain stays in survival mode all the time, unable to relax, so the person can’t tell the difference between a threat then and now. The person remains in a constant state of hypervigilance or strong emotional reactivity.

In this interview from 2022, Dr. Montgomery explains how the brain functions during this process.

Target audience: Psychologists, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, social workers, addiction counselors, and nurses.

Course Content Area: Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship; Human Growth and Development

This CE program is designated as beginner.

There are no conflicts of interest to disclose.

 

 

Syllabus

  • Print Version / Test Preview
  • Audio Interview with Arlene Montgomery, Ph.D.
  • Transcript of Interview with Arlene Montgomery, Ph.D.
  • References and Citations
  • CE Test
  • Evaluation

Author Bio

Arlene Montgomery, Ph.D., LCSW has taught clinical courses since 1993 at the University of Texas at Austin and Smith College School for Social Work. Dr. Montgomery has made numerous presentations on neurobiological findings relevant to the therapeutic alliance, treatment considerations and ethical considerations. Her main writings include her book, Neurobiology Essentials for Clinicians, and her article in the 2020 edition of the Encyclopedia of Social Work, entitled "Interpersonal Neurobiology and Attachment." She also has a private practice with a focus on clients affected by trauma and is a clinical supervisor for licensed master’s social workers fulfilling their requirements for the clinical social worker licensure.

CE Approvals

At Health is an APA-Approved Sponsor At Health, LLC is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. At Health, LLC maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

At Health is an NBCC-Approved SponsorAt Health, LLC has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6949. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. At Health, LLC is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

NAADAC_logoAthealth.com is approved as a continuing education provider by the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC) Provider #148460.

At Health is an Approved Sponsor of the Texas State Board of ExaminersAt Health, LLC is an approved provider of the Texas State Board of Social Work Examiners, provider #7566.

At Health, LLC, Provider #1707, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credits. At Health, LLC, maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 6/3/2020-6/3/2023.

It is At Health's understanding that these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for social work in Arkansas.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

It is At Health's understanding that these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for social workers, professional counselors, marriage and family therapists, master's level psychologists, licensed clinical psychotherapists, and alcohol and other drug abuse counselors in Kansas.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

It is At Health's understanding that these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for mental health practice and for social work in Nebraska.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

It is At Health's understanding that these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for psychologists, pastoral psychotherapists, clinical social workers, clinical mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and alcohol and drug abuse counselors in New Hampshire.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

It is At Health's understanding that  these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for social workers, professional counselors, marital and family therapists, and clinical pastoral therapists in Tennessee.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

Other jurisdictions may accept trainings offered by At Health, LLC for your continuing education requirements. Restrictions may apply. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.”

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Page last modified or reviewed by athealth.com on Aug 17, 2022.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of major regions and normal developmental processes of the brain.
  • Explain the differences between the trauma responses of fight, flight, freeze, and fawn.
  • Articulate how trauma affects small children.
  • Describe the difference between fast and slow circuits to register danger.

3 reviews for Neuroscience of Trauma and Shame

  1. Jill (verified owner)

  2. Grace (verified owner)

  3. Anna (verified owner)

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