Cultural and Testing Implications for Deaf and Autistic Children

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$20.00 for 1 credit

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Description

Dr. Sharp was sitting in on an ADOS-2 a few months ago with a nonverbal little guy. The young boy used a fair amount of sign language, which got Dr. Sharp thinking: do the pragmatic communication problems associated with autism happen in nonverbal or deaf children? After a little Google searching, Dr. Sharp found Dr. Aaron Shield, a linguist out of Miami University, who has specialized in this very niche for much of his academic career. In this interview, they explore the fascinating intersection of deafness and autism. Here are a few topics that they touch on:

  • The neuroanatomical similarities and differences between sign and spoken language
  • The biggest myths associated with American Sign Language
  • Similarities and differences in language acquisition in deaf kids on the spectrum
  • Use of the ADOS-2 (and other common assessment tools) with deaf kids.

Note: Aaron did not mention this on the podcast, but he let me know after our interview that it is still clinically appropriate to use the ADI-R in assessing deaf kids with autism.

Target audience:  Psychologists, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, social workers, addiction counselors, nurses

This CE program is designated as beginner.

Syllabus

  • Print Version / Test Preview
  • Text Interview with Aaron Shield, Ph.D. Linguistics, MA
  • Audio Interview with Aaron Shield, Ph.D. Linguistics, MA
  • References
  • CE Test
  • Evaluation

Author Bio

Dr. Aaron Shield

A native of Providence, Rhode Island, Aaron Shield received his B.A. from Wesleyan University in Italian Studies in 1999. He holds an M.A. (2004) and Ph.D. (2010) in Linguistics from the University of Texas at Austin, where he wrote his dissertation on the effects of autism spectrum disorder on the acquisition of American Sign Language by deaf children. He then completed postdoctoral training in Psychology at the University of Chicago and Boston University. Since 2015 he has been Assistant Professor of Speech Pathology and Audiology at Miami University of Ohio, where he continues to teach and do research on language development and disorders.

Dr. Shield’s interests include how language develops in typical and atypical children, particularly deaf and hearing children acquiring sign language, and deaf and hearing children on the autism spectrum. He is interested in the relationship between language and other aspects of cognition, particularly how differences in social cognition can impact language development. He is also interested in the role that language modality (i.e. speech vs. sign language) affects language structure. He has published widely on these subjects in journals such as Autism, Cognition, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Autism Research, Journal of Communication Disorders, Frontiers in Psychology, and Autism & Developmental Language Impairments, where he is an Associate Editor.

Dr. Jeremy Sharp

Dr. Sharp is a licensed psychologist and Clinical Director at the Colorado Center for Assessment & Counseling, a private practice that he founded in 2009 and grew to include 12 licensed clinicians, three clinicians in training, and a full administrative staff. Dr. Sharp earned his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology from the University of South Carolina before getting his Master’s and PhD in Counseling Psychology from Colorado State University. These days, Dr. Sharp specializes in psychological and neuropsychological evaluation with kids and adolescents.

As the host of the Testing Psychologist Podcast, Dr. Sharp provides private practice consulting for psychologists and other mental health professionals who want to start or grow psychological testing services in their practices. Dr. Sharp lives in Fort Collins, Colorado with his wife (also a therapist) and two young kids.

 

CE Approvals

At Health is an APA-Approved Sponsor At Health, LLC is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. At Health, LLC maintains responsibility for the program and its content.

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At Health is an Approved Sponsor of the California Board of NursingAt Health, LLC is a provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing (CA BRN), Provider # CEP 17059. California Licensed Vocational Nurses and California Psychiatric Technicians can take online courses by California Board of Registered Nursing (CA BRN) approved providers, such as At Health, LLC, to fulfill their CE requirements.

At Health is an Approved Sponsor of the Texas State Board of ExaminersAt Health, LLC is an approved provider of the Texas State Board of Social Work Examiners, provider #7566.

At Health, LLC, Provider #1707, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credits. At Health, LLC, maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 6/3/2019-6/3/2020.

It is At Health's understanding that these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for social work in Arkansas.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

It is At Health's understanding that these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for social workers, professional counselors, marriage and family therapists, master's level psychologists, licensed clinical psychotherapists, and alcohol and other drug abuse counselors in Kansas.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

It is At Health's understanding that these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for mental health practice and for social work in Nebraska.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

It is At Health's understanding that these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for psychologists, pastoral psychotherapists, clinical social workers, clinical mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and alcohol and drug abuse counselors in New Hampshire.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

It is At Health's understanding that  these programs meet the criteria of an approved continuing education program for social workers, professional counselors, marital and family therapists, and clinical pastoral therapists in Tennessee.  State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

Other jurisdictions may accept trainings offered by At Health, LLC for your continuing education requirements. Restrictions may apply. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.”

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Page last modified or reviewed by athealth.com on Mar 24, 2020.

Learning Objectives

Based on the content of this course, I can:

  • Discuss the neuroanatomical similarities between sign and spoken language
  • Articulate the biggest myths associated with American Sign Language
  • Compare and contrast the similarities and differences in language acquisition in deaf kids on the spectrum
  • Educate others on cultural norms that should be considered when working with deaf individuals
  • Explain how to use the ADOS-2 effectively (and other common assessment tools) with deaf kids

3 reviews for Cultural and Testing Implications for Deaf and Autistic Children

  1. Jill (verified owner)

  2. Dennette (verified owner)

  3. Joanna (verified owner)

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